Monday, September 2, 2013

September films at the Cleveland Museum of Art

[Press release from the Cleveland Museum of Art.]

Museum Hours
Friday, August 30, 2013, 7:00 p.m.
Sunday, September 1, 2013, 1:30 p.m.
Directed by Jem Cohen. A guard at Vienna’s Kunsthistorisches Museum befriends an eccentric Canadian visitor in this new movie that critic Jonathan Curiel calls “the best drama ever made about museums and the connection between visual art and everyday life.” Cleveland premiere.
Austria/USA, 2012, color, 107 min.
Admission is $9; CMA members, seniors 65 & over, and students $7; or one CMA Film Series voucher. Vouchers, in books of ten, can be purchased at the Ticket Center for $70 (CMA members $60).
 

Becoming Traviata
Friday, September 6, 2013, 6:45 p.m.
Sunday, September 8, 2013, 1:30 p.m.
 
Directed by Philippe Béziat. Director Jean-Francois Sivadier works with soprano Natalie Dessay on a 2011 French production of Verdi’s La Traviata in this new documentary that strips away the opulence of grand opera to expose the hard work done in stark rehearsal rooms prior to opening night. “An exquisitely observed look at performance and the creative process.” –L.A. Times. Cleveland premiere.
France, 2012, color, subtitles, 120 min.
 
Admission is $9; CMA members, seniors 65 & over, and students $7; or one CMA Film Series voucher. Vouchers, in books of ten, can be purchased at the Ticket Center for $70 (CMA members $60).
 
 
The Wall
Friday, September 13, 2013, 7:00 p.m.
Sunday, September 15, 2013, 1:30 p.m.
 
Directed by Julian Roman Pölsler. With Martina Gedeck (The Lives of Others). A woman hiking in the Alps finds herself cut off from civilization by a mysterious invisible wall, forcing her to fend for herself in a beautiful but forbidding wilderness. “Riveting and emotionally involving from start to finish.” –Screen International. Cleveland premiere.
Austria/Germany, 2012, color, subtitles, 108 min.
 
Admission is $9; CMA members, seniors 65 & over, and students $7; or one CMA Film Series voucher. Vouchers, in books of ten, can be purchased at the Ticket Center for $70 (CMA members $60).
 
 
Computer Chess
Friday, September 20, 2013 7:00 p.m.
Sunday, September 22, 2013, 1:30 p.m.
 
Directed by Andrew Bujalski. In this unique new indie film set three decades ago, brainy computer programmers try to make a machine beat a human at chess during a weekend tournament. “An endearingly nutty, proudly analog tribute to the ultra-nerdy innovators of yesteryear.” –Variety. Cleveland premiere.
USA, 2013, b&w/color, 92 min.
 
Admission is $9; CMA members, seniors 65 & over, and students $7; or one CMA Film Series voucher. Vouchers, in books of ten, can be purchased at the Ticket Center for $70 (CMA members $60).
 
 
Dave Filipi presents: Rare Football Newsreels
Wednesday, September 25 , 2013, 6:45 p.m.
 
Dave Filipi, Director of Film/Video at the Wexner Center in Columbus, is familiar to CMA moviegoers for his annual program of rare baseball films. Tonight he departs the diamond for a special show of vintage pro and college gridiron highlights culled from the Metrotone News Collection at the UCLA Film & Television Archive. Before television, theatrical newsreels allowed fans to see football players from around the country in action. Thanks to film, these greats are still in motion and still larger than life:  the Browns’ Otto Graham and Jim Brown; OSU's Hopalong Cassady; Knute Rockne of Notre Dame; and many others. Special admission $10; CMA members, seniors 65 & over, students $8; no vouchers or passes. Gartner Auditorium.
Special Thanks to Steven Hill and Todd Wiener, UCLA Film & Television Archive.
USA, 1903-1970s, b&w/color, approx. 90 min.
 
Admission is $9; CMA members, seniors 65 & over, and students $7; or one CMA Film Series voucher. Vouchers, in books of ten, can be purchased at the Ticket Center for $70 (CMA members $60).
 
 
Évocateur: The Morton Downey Jr. Movie
Friday, September 27, 2013, 6:45 p.m.
Saturday, September 28, 2013, 1:30 p.m.
Filmmaker in Person!
 
Directed by Seth Kramer, Daniel A. Miller, and Jeremy Newburger. With Stanley Crouch, Sally Jessy Raphael, Al Sharpton, et al.  Morton Downey Jr., the angry, inflammatory NYC talk show host who insulted his guests and espoused rabidly right-wing views during his controversial late 1980s TV show, opened the door for the obnoxious TV and radio blowhards of our own era. Downey’s spectacular rise and precipitous fall are chronicled in this new film. “This pull-no-punches portrait shocks and amuses with equal frequency.” –N.Y. Times. Filmmaker Daniel A. Miller will answer questions after each screening.  Cleveland theatrical premiere.
USA, 2012, color, 90 min.
 
Admission is $9; CMA members, seniors 65 & over, and students $7; or one CMA Film Series voucher. Vouchers, in books of ten, can be purchased at the Ticket Center for $70 (CMA members $60).

Ai Weiwei Film Series
See four films inspired by the Chinese artist, activist and provocateur whose Zodiac Project is on view in the museum’s atrium. All shown in the Morley Lecture Hall. Admission free.
 
Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry
Wednesday, September 4, 2013, 7:00 p.m.
Directed by Alison Klayman. This portrait captures the Chinese dissident artist as he prepares for a major museum exhibition, interacts with friends and family members, and clashes publicly with Chinese government officials.
USA, 2012, color, subtitles, 35mm, 91 min.
Admission free.
 
 
 
Double feature!
So Sorry
Disturbing the Peace
 
Wednesday, September 11, 2013, 6:30 p.m.
Both directed by Ai Weiwei. These two recent documentaries by Ai address the aftermath of the 2008 Sichuan earthquake, in which thousands of students died in collapsed school buildings. The first film concerns the identification of quake victims; the second revolves around the trial of civil rights advocate Tan Zuoren, who criticized the government for shoddy school construction.
China, 2009/2012, subtitles, color, 55/78 min.
Admission Free.
 
 
 
The World
Wednesday, September 18, 2013, 6:30 p.m.
Directed by Jia Zhangke. This piquant take on urbanization and globalization focuses on two Chinese twenty-something transplants from the provinces who work at Beijing World Park, a theme park boasting scale replicas of some of the world’s most iconic buildings. From the director of Still Life.
China/Japan/France, 2004, color, subtitles, 139 min.
Admission Free.

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